Friday, September 27, 2013

More Sides to Another Side to the Story

“No single story captures the full complexity of real-life events … even the stories told by those whose practices and beliefs we reject can be as coherent and compelling as our own.”

I came across this statement at the end of an article written by Moshe Simon-Shoshan that explores the nature of a conflict that took place 2000 years ago (involving the throwing of etrogim at a person) and its parallels to a contemporary one (involving the throwing of eggs at a group of people). I couldn't resist calling attention to the concluding line, quoted above. The full story: At the Wall, is it Religion — or Politics?

Then, in a conference call this afternoon on organizational storytelling, Thaler Pekar referred to “the story that is told, the story that is heard, and the truth,” noting that they might all be different, and then added, “the story that is not told.”

There is always another side to the story.